Songwriting

Songwriting - How To Write A Song.

HOW TO GET STARTED.

The best way is to come up with ideas, titles, themes, development paths, and chord progressions that will get your songwriting going! Test, mix and match your idea with anything and everything. Tips: Use 30 minutes a day playing with one of these ideas and see what happens. Record your song idea to remember it.

TITLES OF SONGS.

A good way to get your song started is to find a title that interests you. The title will keep the song focused, suggest a development path going forward, and define the overall emotional feel of your song. Use it as a starting point and guide. Here are some titles for you to try out as a testing project:

The Living Lies; Somebody Out There; Sweet Honey; Hold On To Love; The Living Edge; Magic Times; The Night Time Is Right; Dancing Moments; Secret Of The King; My Secret Love; When She/He Walks; Night To Live; Dark Wilderness; Just Missed The Train; Mighty Path; Rainy Summer; Summertime Dreams; Wild Mustangs; Walking On Clouds.

Remember that a song title may be already used, but a title can’t be copyrighted. Your own challenge is to come up with something that’s uniquely yours in the lyrics, a fresh insight, your own original story. Remember that you add the spice to the story of your song.

THEMES OF SONGS.

Your song theme is a general idea of what you want to write about. Could be an emotional situation you’ve experienced. Sometimes an idea will come to your head right out of inspiration. Give you some international writers examples of themes in songs, novels, poetry, and paintings:

1, Love situations: Falling in love, falling out of love, your love story, other persons love story, yearning for love, sick of love, needing/wanting love, being in love, looking for love.

2. Life, Friends And Yourself: Growing up, becoming independent, rebelling, teenage life, experiences of life, partying, discovering who you are, your daily life, other persons daily life, overcoming obstacles, old times, good times, bad times, meeting challenges.

3. Family, Relatives And Friendships: Family ties, celebrations, joyful moments, journeys together, moments together, holidays events, conflicts, solving conflicts, laughing together.

4. Society, Community And Culture: Righting wrongs, crossing cultural barriers, alienation, unity, movie trends, theatre performances, art and painting exhibitions, social protest, religion.

5. Politics And Wars: Your opinion, what just happened in the world or your neighbourhood, a local political question, peace, war, war crimes, war victory.

6. Music life: Famous artists, love songs, war songs, your music life, your music struggle, music dreams.

SONG LYRICS DEVELOPMENT.

A song is like a journey or book for the listener. You decide where the story of the song starts and ends. Decide a start and end for your song and fill it with your story. Start out with a feeling, problem, story of a person, tell us what you know, did or gonna do about it and what you hope will be the result of it. The limit is only your own fantasy.

SONG CHORD PROGRESSIONS.

Use 3-Chord progressions, 4-Chord progressions or Full-Chord progressions to start your song. Transpose and add notes but try to keep your song simple. In today’s songs the relation of the melody to the chords in the progression is the most interesting. Best is to start with 3-Chord progressions.

MELODY OF THE SONG.

Sometimes the melody comes with the lyrics or without the words. Give it time to ripen. And sometimes it all beginns with a riff or the melody of the song. Take your time and develope how you want the verse, chorus and stick fit together.

TEST AND RECORD YOUR SONG.

Always record the idea of your verse, chorus and stick into your computer, cellphone or tape recorder. Do something totally different. Take a walk, take a bike ride or cook some dinner and eat it. Come back with fresh ears, energy and listen to what you have recorded.

Good Luck with your song project! Peter Liliequist.

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